Dozens rally at Dallas Police headquarters following Oak Lawn attacks

The fight to keep the Oak Lawn neighborhood safe moved to the Dallas police headquarters Sunday evening.

About 50 to 60 people participated in a rally at at the police station to protest the lack of police response to the outbreak of attacks, the latest on Thursday.

Since September 20th, there have been 13 assaults on men in the predominately gay neighborhood.

People who attended the rally were encouraged to bring signs, flags and drums.

"There's not enough safety there.  Why do we have to walk in twos or threes just because you want to make it home alive. Why do we have to live like that?  We need to make sure that Dallas is out there supporting us," said Sergio Lopez, a rally participant.

Those who showed up say they decided to chant in front of the police station in hopes of putting more pressure on police and to keep the attacks in the public eye.

"Right now we've got two and half months of terror in the Oak Lawn neighborhood and no information on who we should even be looking for.  We've got a couple of descriptions, but they vary case to case. We want answers," said Daniel Cates with Citizens for a Safer Oak Lawn.

 On Friday night, Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings, along with City councilman Adam Medrano and other activists walked through the Cedar Springs entertainment district and announced the creation of a special task force charged with tackling violent crime in the area.

Activist groups say they've noticed an increased police presence since the attacks began, but Cates says they still feel police could do more to protect people who frequent the neighborhood.

"We appreciate the show that we saw on Friday night.  And I understand there were some visible cruisers on Saturday night.  But why does it take us this long to get to this point?  What is the long-term solution? Why are these guys still not in jail?"

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