ITT Tech students left in limbo after school shutdown

Lori Brown reports.

It's been a little more than two weeks since ITT Technical Institute shut down its schools across the country. That left students wondering what to do their credits that most other schools will not accept.

About 300 students attended classes at the Richardson campus and have since then been working hard to figure out what they can do now.

It's said that no one can take away your education. But for thousands of nursing students, it feels like ITT Tech did just that.

After 10 years as a medical assistant, Simone Brackens enrolled at ITT to become a registered nurse. The mother of two young children took a pay cut to pursue her education while working. Now, it may have all been for nothing.

"We only had 12 more weeks to go,” explained Brackens.

With only one class left, Brackens learned that none of her credits may transfer. El Centro College's Dean of Nursing explained why.

Right now, it's sitting with Texas Board of Nursing,” said Joan Becker with El Centro College. “We're waiting on them to find out what they think should be done."

Becker says it's complicated because ITT’s curriculum is very different from Dallas Community College.

"You feel so bad for them. They have so much invested in the program,” said Becker. “Some of them have already been accepted into BSN programs to go on for their bachelor’s. And without graduating, that has to be put on hold."

Faced with federal sanctions, ITT shut its doors to its 35,000 students around the country just before the start of its fall semester.

Brackens says the total cost of the ITT program was about $52,000 compared to El Centro College’s $10,000 program.

Strapped with loans, Brackens is getting few answers.

"It's my future being destroyed right before my eyes,” she said.

The Wall Street Journal reports a laid-off ITT Tech teacher and an office staffer filed a lawsuit Tuesday on behalf of the 8,000 employees caught up in the closure.

The lawsuit wants to hold ITT Tech accountable for not giving employees a 60-day notice required under federal law.

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